In an ongoing effort to protect important historic resources the Foundation is working with property owners to designate significant properties protect City of Tucson Historic Landmarks. In 2017 the Foundation began preparation of the Stanley Williamson House City Landmark nomination.

The Williamson House, designed and built in the Spanish Colonial Revival style, is located in Tucson’s San Clemente Subdivision (1930), and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The residence was commissioned in 1930 by real estate and San Clemente developer Stanley Williamson as both his own home and as the prototypical property to set the architectural tone and character of the new development. Williamson hired Los Angeles based Architect A. J. Weid to design this and other early speculative homes in the San Clemente colony.

  • Stanley Williamson House
    photo: Jude Ignacio and Gerardine Vargas
  • Stanley Williamson House
    photo: Jude Ignacio and Gerardine Vargas
  • Stanley Williamson House
    photo: Jude Ignacio and Gerardine Vargas

The Williamson House is eligible as a city of Tucson Historic Landmark. 1. Williamson House is from a significant period in Tucson’s history: Post-World War I Development (1920-1945) and is a distinct architectural style that is least 50 years old. 2. Williamson House is an outstanding examples of Spanish Colonial Revival design and is associated with significant historic events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of our history in particular: Community Development in Tucson 1920 – 1945. 3. Williamson House exemplifies the architectural period in which it was built and has distinguishing characteristics of an architectural style: Spanish Colonial Revival; Stanley Williamson, developer; A. J. Weid, Architect. 4. Williamson House contributes historic, cultural, and social importance relating to the heritage of the Tucson community; and 5. Williamson House relates positively to buildings in its immediate vicinity in terms of scale, size, massing, etc., such that its removal would be an irreparable loss to the setting and a diminishment to the architectural heritage of Tucson.

If you have a significant historic building and want to discuss protective designation contact the Foundation at info@presevetucson.org

Downloadable Resources

City-of-Tucson-Historic-Landmark-39-Palomar-April-1817-Draft.pdf
download
Stanley Williamson House City of Tucson Historic Landmark Application

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